high end

Urban Decay Vice 2 Palette for Holiday 2013


For the holiday season, Urban Decay launched the second iteration of thier Vice Palette. This time around, the palette contains 20 new shades, featuring different levels of boldness and textures. The packaging is not much different than the first version of the palette, e.g, purple magnetic case, full-size mirror, a double-ended brush included, etc. The palette seems to contain more shimmer/glitters than mattes, and a good mix of neutrals and bright hues. The colors also seem to mix well enough-a good combo of lid colors, darker colors, and brow highlights, but they also seem like they can be used easily with other shades in the brand’s range or your own personal stash. 
All of UD’s products (including the brushes) are cruelty-free. However, the brand’s parent company is L’Oreal, which does utilize unkind animal practices. Hence, buying UD products will benefit their parent company’s less-kind animal practices. Each pan contains 0.03 oz of product, and a full-size UD shadow has 0.05 oz. But none of these shades are currently available for solo purchase, so if you love most of them, it’s pretty value-packed: the whole shebang is only $59 USD. 
The Vice 2 palette is currently available for purchase on urbandecay.com and will in stores soon.

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Obsessive Compulsive Cosmetics Lip Tar in Trollop Review

Image via Beautylish

I was so eager to get my hands on one of OCC’s Lip Tars. I had heard a lot about them: they were pigment-packed, comfortable to wear, and long lasting. After scanning the tons of awesome color options, I finally decided on Trollop, which is a “pinked coral.” That description is spot-on: it’s a warm-toned, medium pink-coral. It leans slightly more orange than pink, even on my fair, pink-toned skin. This maintained a soft shine and satin-like finish throughout it’s entire wear.
Sadly, one area where this lip tar fell majorly short was in wear. For a liquid lipstick, I expected at least 5 hours of great wear, expecting it to clock in at over 8 hours (as I had heard these were “long-wearing”). However, this had worn for only 2 hours, and left a subtle stain for another 2. However, short wear time wasn’t the only problem. After just an hour, the product started bunching up along the top of my lower lip, like a film. By 2 hours, the color was still on, but my natural lip color was showing through. 
Lip Tars come with instructions, which may be helpful to newbies. They recommend using the tiniest bead of color with the included lip brush, and I find that it’s true. You really only need the smallest dot to cover your entire mouth with bright, even pigment. I don’t have much experience with lip brushes, but I found it gets the job done well enough. Lip Tars are cruelty-free and vegan, using natural ingredients like hemp. They’re also pleasantly mint-scented. I found that this product wears comfortably, but more so if your lips are already in good condition. If your lips are feeling a little dry or flaky, this will only dry them out more, while settling into the cracks/flakes of your lips. So take care to condition them first.
I really like this product’s packaging. Lip Tars come in squeeze tubes with a fine nozzle. The cap is white and screws on, giving the whole item a look similar to artist’s paints. I find the nozzle works perfectly-it doesn’t let too much product out at once, giving you just the right amount, as a little goes a long way. However, the package is smaller than Youtube or pictures might trick you into thinking! It’s not very tall, but it contains a good amount (0.33 oz-more than 3x what a standard tube of lipstick contains). This smallness makes them easy to store. The product, brush, and instructions come in a clear zip-up pouch that I think is convenient for travel. 
One Lip Tar will set you back $18 USD. While the wear of Trollop was disappointing, I’m willing to repurchase this formula in different colors, as LTs come in more color options (45 at this time), with bolder pigment and more product than most competitively priced brands. However, this formula generally comes in just this one semi-matte formula. In spite of that, one LT is still cheaper per ounce ($54.54) than, say, one tube of MAC lipstick ($15 for 0.1 oz, or $150 per ounce). I definitely think the few extra dollars at face value are worth it.
For an indie brand, OCC is getting some mass-market attention. While most indie brands are resigned to their online shops only, OCC can be found at cosmetic retailer Sephora as well, making their products easier for those who don’t enjoy online shopping to get a hold of. 
Color: 5/5

Wear: 2.5/5
Formula: 3.5/5
Packaging: 5/5
Price: 5/5
Wow Factor: 3/5
Overall: 4 (B-)

Recommend: I do think Trollop is a pretty coral, but at this price point, I expect it to wear a little bit better. It’s not such a striking or unique color that you can’t find reasonable dupes with better wear for a comparable or cheaper cost.
OCC products can be found on their website, or at Sephora.

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Urban Decay Book of Shadows Volume III Review (DISCONTINUED)

Image via Beautylish

Astute eyes may have noticed that the order I had been reviewing Urban Decay eyeshadows in was oddly matching that of the now-discontinued Book of Shadows Vol. III. That’s because it’s true-I don’t own the individual shadows; instead, I own this chic palette. I received it 2010, so it’s relatively long gone. However, a lot of the shades have been added to the brand’s new permanent lineup, so never fear about missing out. While each shade (and liner included) has been individually reviewed on PV for your conveniance, this will focus on the palette as a whole investment.
There are 16 shades in this palette, which sounds like a hearty number. However, there’s not as much variety in this palette as one might expect or hope for. There is only 1 matte (Perversion), 4 glitter textures (most of which have frustrating fallout), 5 frosts, and the remaining 6 are shimmers. Also, nearly all of these shades pull cool-toned. Maui Wowie, Smog, and Suspect lean the warmest. Sadly, only 8 shades received a grade of B- or higher-half the palette managed to disappoint.
 All of these things limit the palette: the shiny textures tend to bring out the creases around the eyes of mature skin, the bolder colors would have to be saved for special occasions/nights out for most professional women, and the cooler tones exclude ladies with warmer skin tones. While I definitely advocate any woman wearing whatever she wants, lots of ladies shy away from colors, textures, or finishes that they feel don’t “flatter” them, and I feel it was a mistake for Urban Decay to leave them out. 
The liners in this palette were nice treats, though. Zero was a great black that performed well and would look with a multitude of looks-it was a fan favorite for a reason. While Ransom performed considerably less well, it wasn’t awful, and seemed to be popular with both the brand and buyers alike. I was disappointed in the shade’s discontinuation. So while many are fortunate to have the shade on hand from owning this palette, or one of the limited-edition liner sets, I wouldn’t say in hindsight that picking up the palette just for that shade would’ve been worth it. 
Lastly, BoS 3 contained a travel vial of Primer Potion, in it’s old style packaging: a stand-up, genie-like bottle with a screw-top lid and pull-out, doe foot wand. I preferred that this packaging included a wand, although I can understand the switch to a squeeze tube (less product waste). Regardless, the primer performed well and is a total lifesaver-this palette was my first introduction to makeup, and if I hadn’t received the primer, I’m unsure if I ever would’ve got around to buying it on my own. Now I couldn’t live without it, so it definitely is a great inclusion for the people who are new to makeup, haven’t tried a primer or can’t afford it, or don’t see the purpose of using one (this may change some minds!) 
The palette itself is sleek and functional, although I personally feel it could’ve been compacted even further. I say this because the top of the palette, that flips up, reveals a lit-up pop-up of a city skyline, with a mirror behind it. The illustration is cute, but I have never, in 3 years, used that mirror. (It’s sort of hard to see yourself in it, both because you’re peering over the pop-up, and because I found it to be sort of “foggy” and small). The tray housing the shadows, liners, and primer pulls all the way out (with a ribbon tab) if you desire, and slips back inside quite easily. Despite the black cardboard the palette is made out of, it feels sturdy, is neatly organized and labeled, and doesn’t stain. It’s small and sturdy enough to be an excellent travel companion, especially if you’re travelling for play rather than work, as those bolder colors will be of more use.

The one thing I can’t argue on, is that this palette did pack quite a bit of value. While nothing was full sized (0.03 oz of shadow vs 0.05 full size, 0.03 oz of liner vs 0.04 full size, and 0.13 oz of primer vs 0.37 oz full size), UD certainly didn’t skimp. 16 full-size shadows would’ve cost $288, 2 full-size liners are $38, and a full-size primer is $20. This would’ve set you back $346 for comparatively few more ounces of product. However, UD sold the packaged deal for $54 USD. I reinforce the idea that this makes it a great starter set for newbies like I was, because it offers the chance to experiment with fun, bright colors and different textures at a much more palatable price.

This palette pre-dates Urban Decay’s acquisition by L’Oreal, as well as the China scandal, making it more “truly” cruelty-free.

Colors: 2/5
Wear: 4/5
Formula: 4/5
Packaging: 4/5
Price: 5/5
Wow Factor: 3/5
Overall: 3.7 (C+)
Recommend: No. This palette seems aimed at younger girls of a limited skin-tone. Despite it’s affordability, reasonably good wear time and formulas, there wasn’t much creativity or variety in the color selection. Since most of the colors are no longer limited edition, there’s very little special about having this palette.

You can browse Urban Decay’s full-range of products, including these shadows in single-pot form, at department stores and cosmetic shops like Sephora. medianet_width=’600′; medianet_height= ‘250’; medianet_crid=’228266391′;

MAC Viva Glam Gaga Lipglass Review (DISCONTINUED)

Image via Shopping

When I was new to the world of makeup, and still needed fill out my basic collection, one thing was clear to me: I absolutely needed MAC’s Viva Glam Gaga Lipglass. I was a huge Gaga fan at the time (a proud “Little Monster”-paws up) and felt like combining my two interests was common sense. The lip gloss she released was a milky, blue toned baby pink. It was mostly opaque, but had a touch of sheerness (my more pigmented natural lip color peeked through a bit). It’s quite similar, but less bright (you could say more “daytime” or “wearable” depending on your standards) than it’s big sister, the Viva Glam Gaga Lipstick.
VGG applied very smoothly and evenly-it didn’t bunch up or settle into lip lines during initial application. The color covered my lips nicely and had quite a healthy shine. Like all MAC lip glosses, this was had a thick texture and a tacky feel on the lips. Personally, this has never been off-putting to me, though. 
After an hour of wear, The pink color was mostly gone. There is still some of the glossy sheen intact at this point, and the tacky feel on the mouth. I noticed that the pigment had bunched up in the corners of my mouth. It wore this way for another hour and half before I noticed that all of the color had migrated into a weird ring around the inner rim of my lips (towards the inside of my mouth). It was like an inverted lipstick ring! I’ve never experienced bunching up like that before. 
Like other MAC lip glosses,  VGG came in a cylindrical plastic tube with a black cap, and was pleasantly vanilla scented. The brand label was printed on the side, towards the bottom, as usual, but Lady G’s signature was superimposed around the tube in vibrant red script. This lip gloss came with a doe-foot wand applicator. 
While MAC is considered by many to set the average standard in the cosmetic industry, it is not always the better option. While $15 USD for a MAC gloss is relatively affordable, that price does not always translate to great quality (like with this gloss’s weird bunching up). Revlon Super Lustrous Lip Glosses, for example, share MAC’s smooth application; however, they also wear longer and fade away evenly while sacrificing color payoff. At this price, MAC will set you back $88.24 per ounce, whereas Revlon will cost you $39.95 per ounce. Depending on the individual consumer’s needs, it may be considerably better to save on MAC glosses, especially with a shade like VGG, which is considerably common.
The shorter wear (even for a gloss) with this shade is really disappointing. Gloss is a great alternative to lippies for women who fear being too made up. However, a shade this fussy would require every-other-hour reapplication, and many people don’t have jobs or school settings that allow such frequent touch-ups (or, they just find it annoying). So while a pretty shade, it’s not a great option for every day, and is better saved for something casual or fun, like a night out. All proceeds from Viva Glam products benefit the MAC AIDS Fund, which provides supplies and care to people living with the disease. MAC performs animal testing where mandated by law.
Color: 4.5/5

Wear: 3/5
Formula: 3.5/5 
Packaging: 5/5
Price: 2/5
Wow Factor: 3/5
Overall: 3.5 (C)
Recommend: Viva Glam Gaga didn’t leave a bad impression on me, but it didn’t impress me, either. The shade was cute, but common, had a thick texture that many find displeasing, and bunched up very oddly. Unless you’re a collector or super Gaga fan, I don’t feel it’s worth hunting down.

You can browse past and present Viva Glam collections at maccosmetics.com.

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Make Up For Ever Aqua Cream in 01 Anthracite Review

Image via Beautylish

I had recently developed a love for cream products when I was browsing Sephora’s website. After hearing great things about Make Up For Ever’s quality and pigmentation, I decided to take the plunge and try out one of their Aqua Creams, in 01 Anthracite. Surprisingly, the shade is remarkably similar to how it appears in the photo above. It’s a steely, cool, dark grey with subtle shimmer. 
Aqua Creams are multi-purpose, and I tested them in multiple ways: as a cream liner, as a cream eyeshadow, and as an eyeshadow base. Anthracite was also formulated for use on the cheeks, but I didn’t test it for this purpose, as it’s not a color I-or most women, even the bravest of us-would sport there. (I imagine the only circumstances a shade like this would be applied on the face is for a very high fashion photo shoot). 
As a liner, this went on seamlessly, with one dip into the pot being enough to opaquely, evenly cover the whole lash line. Needless to say, I had no issues with dragging/tugging/skipping. The shimmer was noticeable-it twinkled under bright light-and had a nice, metallic sheen. The color seemed so much more nuanced on the lash line. It was absolutely beautiful to look at. Under very close inspection, the base color seemed to have a bluish/greenish tinge-it’s undeniably cool toned. It reminded me vaguely of my beloved Urban Decay Junkie eyeliner, except more steely. It wore flawlessly as well, reaching 8 hours easily, and only wearing off ever so slightly at the inner corner after a grueling 12 hours of wear. This is a one and done formula-it’ll stay put no matter what and look great until you remove it.
As a cream shadow, I was a little less wowed. On the lid, it looks very steely, metallic, and cosmic-the shade is undeniably pretty. However, it creases within seconds of applying, even with primer underneath. In fact, it creases more with primer than without. It also dries really quickly and sticks to wherever it’s placed, which makes blending a hassle (so work quickly). The creasing isn’t a deal-breaker, really, as it’s only noticeable with the eyes closed-looking in a mirror or conversing with someone, no one would be the wiser. But it is a flaw in the formula, so it’s worth pointing out. It wore effortlessly without further problems for over 8 hours.
Finally, as a primer, this is pretty disappointing-it’s not going to replace my Urban Decay Primer Potion any time soon. As a base, Aqua Cream is difficult and dry. Oddly, I had to wait for it to dry before I could effectively apply powder over top. Usually a sticky/tacky base is desired for extra pigment depth and staying power. Aqua Cream, however, somehow “ate” the color when it was still creamy-I tested Urban Decay eyeshadow in Perversion over top-a rich, matte black-and it just vanished from my lid. It was as if I had nothing on my brush. I was able to pack it on after the Aqua Cream had dried, but I found this occurrence bizarre. Also, if you don’t wait for the base to dry first, the shadow over top will crease (if the base is dry, the shadow has no problems with creasing). As I’ve already mentioned, Aqua Cream stays put, so an eyeshadow over it will be difficult to blend. However, it didn’t look any sheerer or less rich compared to the same shadow over UDPP. Around 4 hours of wear, a hint of shadow had migrated to the inner corner of my eye (but was easily wiped away). At 6 hours, I noticed Anthracite’s inherent shimmer peeking through slightly (Perversion is by no means sheer). By 12 hours, the shadow was, admittedly, darker and more opaque than when UDPP was used. However, some of this can be attributed to Anthracite being a similar-toned base. It also doesn’t make up for how fussy it was as a primer-most of us will never be in a situation where we need dark black shadow on for 12 hours straight, anyway.
In all instances, the Aqua Cream was smooth, creamy (at first) and opaque-the texture was a dream to work with, and I needed little product on my brush for the coverage I desired. I’ve had this product for longer than I should’ve, and it still shows no traces of drying out. I found it worked best for me as a liner, hands down. It wasn’t very disappointing as a cream shadow, either-some “hidden” creasing, but a special, lovely color that outweighed the problem. I would not want to go through the trouble of utilizing Anthracite as a shadow base again, though. I also noticed that this had a weird, very off-putting scent. I’m not particular about odors, but this was very unpleasant. I don’t know how to describe the fragrance other than chemical and “gritty.” It’s not noticeable on the eye, however, but you may catch a whiff of it as you dip your brush into the jar.
Aqua Creams come in clear, circular plastic jars with black, screw-on lids. The plastic is sturdier than average, but I was under the impression AQs were housed in glass. The plastic is actually a bonus, not a drawback, though. While it may feel less luxurious, it is by far more travel and drop safe-there’s far less risk that this will shatter or crack. These are flat-topped and easy to store and organize. The size of the container seems to be on the smaller side of medium. 
However, this smallness is strictly limited to the jar size. MUFE Aqua Creams are $23 USD for 0.21 oz of product-which is a heavier fill weight than MAC’s Paint Pots. However, AQs are only marginally more expensive per ounce-a mere 70 cents, to be exact (MUFE rings up to be $109.52, while MAC will cost you $108.82). Paint Pots are more tried and true bases, though-not really designed to be as multipurpose as AQs (although by all means, nothing is stopping anyone from using them in multiple ways), but I wanted to compare relatively similar products. Make Up For Ever is by no means an unheard of brand, it’s considerably rare to see. You won’t see MUFE counters set up in every department store. In fact, MUFE is only carried in one Sephora in my entire state, in a smaller city about 45 minutes away. Your best bet is to shop for them online. Their own site, in fact, redirects buyers to Sephora. MUFE performs animal testing where mandated by law.
AS AN EYELINER:
Color:
5/5
Wear: 5/5
Formula: 5/5
Packaging: 5/5
Price: 5/5
Wow Factor: 5/5
Overall: 5 (A+)

AS A CREAM SHADOW:
Color:
5/5
Wear: 4/5
Formula: 3/5
Packaging: 5/5
Price: 3/5
Wow Factor: 4/5
Overall: 4 (B-)

AS AN EYESHADOW BASE:
Color: 3.5/5
Wear: 4/5
Formula: 2.5/5
Packaging: 5/5
Price: 2/5
Wow Factor: 3/5
Overall: 3.3 (C-)

Combined Scores: 4.1 (B-)
Recommend: Yes, Anthracite performs it’s various purposes considerably well (doing some functions better than others). The color is so pretty, the price for the amount you get is pleasing, and it lasts forever, making it something I feel comfortable recommending to others.
Make Up For Ever products are available exclusively at Sephora.

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Urban Decay Eyeshadow in Psychedelic Sister Review

Image via Beautylish

Purple is one of my favorite colors, and I find that not only does purple shadow often look pretty in the pan, but it can translate nicely to the lid as well. Sadly, purple fundamentally has issues to work with (or so I hear). Urban Decay eyeshadow in Psychedelic Sister is a perfect example of “pretty but kind of fussy.” The brand describes is as a “deep amethyst shimmer,” and once again, I find that’s not quite accurate. PS looked more like a warm-toned, medium royal purple to me. 
On the lid without primer, the shadow went on richly and opaquely, but it got everywhere-under my eye and on my browbone-not where I placed it. Even when blended, it’s still an annoying mess. Also, the purple tinge drew negative attention to my undereye circles, since the powder fell all over the underye area. When a base was used, the pigment didn’t appear any brighter or richer, but the color was more controlled and detained to where I had originally placed it . In both instances the shadow blends easily. However, when worn without a primer, it blends a little too easily, and ends up sheering out pretty quickly. The powder also ended up feeling a bit dry.
But Psychedelic Sister didn’t stop disappointing me there. After just an hour, the shadow was so, so faded. Without a primer, it was completely sheer and nearly invisible, except for a bruise-like tinge. With primer, the color was more purple and there was more product intact, but it still looked considerably faded compared to the initial application-it also looked almost gone. By 2 hours the shadow also looked bruise-like when a primer was used. Strangely, when a base wasn’t used, the color remained consistently like a bruise for 8 hours. When a primer was used underneath, the color faded more rapidly, looking undetectable unless under very bright light at only 6 hours. That was the first (and so far only) time primer has made a product’s wear worse. 
Psychedelic Sister used to be confined strictly to the Book of Shadows III. However, with UD’s recent shadow relaunch, PS was added to the permanent range. It can now be purchased solo, in the brand’s new packaging. The containers are small, circular plastic with flip-top lids. The lids have a clear window, and are flat, making organizing, storing, and travelling with easy. I love that the minimal plastic in the packaging doesn’t take up extra space in makeup storage. The product pans also pop out, making transfer to a magnetic palette much simpler and safer than it used to be.
UD shadows retail for $18 USD (or $360 an ounce) for 0.05 oz of product. This is very important to consider when purchasing an item. PS in particular is far too problematic (and common of a color) to justify at that price tag. MAC has a variety of purples to choose from at $14 USD ($300 an ounce), and Wet ‘n’ Wild makes an 8-pan palette featuring many purple hues for only $4.99 USD ($16.60 an ounce). Both of these brands consistently have better quality, and are much more wallet-friendly, than this fussy eyeshadow. What could make it worth the purchase to certain consumers is that Urban Decay is somewhat animal-friendly. The brand itself is cruelty-free, however it’s parent company, L’Oreal, does perform animal testing.  

WITH PRIMER:
Color:
3/5
Wear: 1/5
Formula: 2/5
Packaging: 5/5
Price: 1/5
Wow Factor: 2/5
Overall: 2.3 (D-)

WITHOUT PRIMER:
Color: 3/5
Wear: 1/5
Formula: 1/5
Packaging: 5/5
Price: 1/5
Wow Factor: 1/5
Overall: 2 (D-)

Combined Scores: 2.2 (D-)
Recommend: No way. Psychedelic Sister is way too fussy and poorly-wearing to justify at $18. Many other brands are more affordable and do much better.

Urban Decay products are available at department stores, and at cosmetic retailers, like Ulta and Sephora. medianet_width=’600′; medianet_height= ‘250’; medianet_crid=’228266391′;

Urban Decay Eyeshadow in Snatch Review

Image via Beautylish

Urban Decay has a penchant for taking the average color and giving it a little something extra. Take Snatch for example. The brand describes it as “pale peach shimmer with gold glitter.” I found it to be a rose gold with gold glitter chunks. The swatches feel soft, with the glitter feeling very finely milled and not at all gritty. It was a bit powdery when using a brush, though.
Without primer, the gold element of Snatch was less perceptible. It looked more or less like a flesh tone. The glitter didn’t quite make it to the eye; there was some minor fallout. As a result, it ends up looking more shimmery than glittery. With primer, this looked brighter and much more rosy, with the gold tones coming out more. The glitter stuck to the eye better with a base as well. It appeared noticeably on the lid, and there was no fallout during the initial application. 
Sadly, Urban Decay shadows have a tendency to lose their initial look quite quickly. This happened when Snatch was used without a base. It looked consistent for an hour, but by 2 hours, it looked a touch faded. By 4 hours, it was very faded. With primer, this wore flawlessly for 8 hours. I had no issues with fallout when Snatch was worn with a base.
UD shadows went through a packaging revamp. The new packaging features pop-out shadow pans that make transferring the color to magnetic palettes easily. The containers are small, circular plastic with a clear window in the flip-top lid that allows the owner to see the color within. The shape and size are small enough to store and travel with easily. Also, the tops of lids are flat, so if need be, these are stackable.
UD shadows are $18 USD for 0.05 oz of product. This product amount is average, but UD is a little more expensive per ounce than comparatively-priced MAC ($360 vs $300). Snatch is a relatively common color (especially when it looks more flesh toned, as it does without primer). It wears okay, but there is some fallout and it’s a bit powdery in the pan, which are things to consider at this price point. UD is a cruelty-free/vegan brand, but is owned by L’Oreal, which utilizes it’s profits from Urban Decay sales for animal testing.

WITH PRIMER:Color: 4/5
Wear: 5/5
Formula: 5/5
Packaging: 5/5
Price: 4/5
Wow Factor: 3/5
Overall: 4.3 (B+)

WITHOUT PRIMER:Color: 3/5
Wear: 2.5/5
Formula: 3/5
Packaging: 5/5
Price: 2/5
Wow Factor: 3/5
Overall: 3.1 (C-)


Combined Scores: 3.7 (C+)
Recommend: Snatch is an average color that performs in an average way. Without a base, it fades quickly and has fallout problems. If you always use a base, then this shadow will perform better, but the price for the quality isn’t worth it to me.
Urban Decay products are available at department stores and at specialty stores like Ulta and Sephora.

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Urban Decay Eyeshadow in Radium Review

Image via Beautylish

Ah, blue. This is perhaps the trickiest eyeshadow color for me to wear. Despite this, I’m often drawn to how beautiful the color looks in the pan. Urban Decay Eyeshadow in Radium is one of these undeniably lovely to look at blues. It’s a bright, medium-toned shade, not quite navy. This is what I call “primary blue”, the first color one thinks of when she thinks of “blue.” Without primer, it looks like a soft, opaque denim shade. Naturally, with primer, Radium is bluer and brighter, and ends up looking more true to pan. UD calls it “peacock blue”, but that’s not accurate. “Peacock blue” is much greener. Radium is a much darker blue than it’s matching eyeliner, which looks more aqua in comparison.
Sadly, this shade is a bit powdery. I ended up with pigment under my eye when a base was not used. Even with a primer, it was still messy and fussy. In both instances, it was easy to blend. However, without a base, the color sheered out easily. Over one, it did not disappear when blended. 
Either way, Radium had faded after just an hour. The pigment was brighter (obviously) when a primer was used, but it was still markedly faded compared to initial application.Without primer, the color was blotchy and uneven at the 2 hour mark. By 4 hours, it was as if the shade had worn off and left a stain: it looks completely sheer, faded and translucent. With primer, Radium wore consistently (with that initial fading) for a total of 8 hours.

Urban Decay eyeshadows come in small, circular plastic containers. The pan pops out easily, and can quickly be converted to a magnetic palette if one chooses. They’re small and sturdy enough to travel comfortably with. Their petite size and flat tops make them easy to store as well. There is a clear window in the flip-top lid that allows the owner to see which color is inside. On the whole, the packaging is secure and very easy to use, store, and travel with.

UD shadows contain 0.05 oz of product, which is average. However, at $18 USD, it costs more per ounce than MAC (obviously, drugstore hues). This is important to consider when one evaluates the quality of a product. In this case, Radium is relatively basic (almost every brand has a standard blue), so dupes aren’t hard to find. Adding to the equation how poorly Radium performs, it would be best to save your money and purchase a cheaper, yet similar, shade. Urban Decay is a cruelty-free brand, which is important to many consumers. However, their parent company, L’Oreal, does perform animal testing, and profits from UD sales can contribute to that action.

WITH PRIMER:
Color:
3/5
Wear: 4/5
Formula: 3/5
Packaging: 5/5
Price: 2/5
Wow Factor: 3/5
Overall: 3.3 (C-)

WITHOUT PRIMER:
Color:
2/5
Wear: 2/5
Formula: 2/5
Packaging: 5/5
Price: 1/5
Wow Factor: 2/5
Overall: 2.3 (D-)

Combined Scores: 2.8 (D+)
Recommend: No. Radium is way to common, poorly-performing, and expensive for what you get. There are cheaper, higher-quality dupes on the market.

Urban Decay products can be found at department stores, online, and at cosmetic retailers like Sephora. medianet_width=’600′; medianet_height= ‘250’; medianet_crid=’228266391′;

Urban Decay 24/7 Glide-On Eye Pencil in Junkie Review

Image via Sephora

You know that special feeling you get when you find a product that’s your Holgy Grail? That’s what I felt when I tried Urban Decay’s 24/7 Glide-On Eye Pencil in Junkie. Technically, the color is supposed to be “metallic teal shimmer with gold micro-sparkle.” I found it to be a beautiful dark, cool-toned hunter/jade green. There is a noticeable hint of blue, but it’s far too dark and green to be a true teal. The gold micro-glitter is in there though. Not just in the pencil, but it actually makes it onto the lid (doesn’t get lost in translation, and no fallout). So beautiful! It’s a nice alternative to basic black for those who like a little spunk in their daytime makeup. On the waterline, the color is slightly less dark, but still a darker green with a nice metallic gold effect. The glitter is fine and non-irritating enough to show up and be comfortable to wear even on this sensitive area.
Junkie was one of the stiffer pencils I’ve tried from Urban Decay. Don’t get me wrong, it was still soft, easy to use and slipped right over the lash line without any difficulty; it just had a slightly harder texture. However, this pencil was crazy pigmented. I expect boldness from UD liners, but this was just above and beyond, even for the brand. The color is so unique, and like I’ve said, the glitter shows up nicely (and stays put). Like all UD liners, this stays creamy and easy to blend for a moment before drying down.
I’m thrilled to report that this shade wore flawlessly for over 9 hours on the lash line. No smudging, migrating, flaking, wearing away or anything, even in upwards of 80 degree heat. After 2 hours on the waterline, the metallic sheen had worn away, but the color remained bold (and the glitter was still noticeable). It faded consistently from 3-6 hours. However, even at 6 hours, the color was still comparatively dark. I removed the product at this point, but I’m interested in seeing how much longer it would’ve worn, as it was still going strong!
UD liners come with silver plastic caps and silver ends. The color of the wood is colored to match the shade of the pigment within (in this case, dark green) with the brand and color name labeled in white. This color-coding is not only cute but functional, as it makes the products easy to store and one can quickly find the color she’s looking for. They’re somewhat long and thin, but I’ve had no problem storing the pencils, both in a drawer and standing upright in a cup with other liners. 
The full-size pencil contains 0.04 oz of product, which is average, and costs $19 USD. I think for the originality, ease-of-use, and staying power of Junkie, that’s a very easy to swallow price. I believe it’s worth every penny for the quality I received. This liner used to be apart of the Electric Liner Set, which was limited edition in 2011. However, UD recently added it to their permanent range! I would be so heartbroken if they ever discontinued it now. UD is a cruelty-free brand. Their parent company, L’Oreal, does test on animals, however.
Color: 5/5
Wear: 5/5
Formula: 5/5
Packaging: 5/5
Price: 5/5
Wow Factor: 5/5
Overall: 30 (A+)
Recommend: 100% absolutely. This is my HG liner (basic black is a dime a dozen) and would die if it ever got discontinued. Junkie is a unique color with amazing wear and quality. Love! ❤
Urban Decay products can be purchased at department stores, from their online site, and from cosmetic retailers, like Sephora.

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Urban Decay 24/7 Glide-On Eye Pencil in Radium Review (SET EXCLUSIVE)


Urban Decay is killing me. Their recent color changes (to both their shadows and more recently, their 24/7 Glide-On Eye Pencils) is driving me crazy. Many good quality colors were given the boot to make room for lesser-quality palette exclusives (anyone with Book of Shadows IV knows which shades I’m referring to). Sounds good in theory, but a lot of nonsense shades were ushered into the lineup while good, in-demand products got kicked. And some standout shades, like Radium, which was only available in the Electric Eye Pencil Set in 2011, didn’t get pulled out of their palette-only status. 

The color was defined as a “shimmery bright blue.” This is a pretty accurate description, except there was no shimmer in this color at all. Radium struck me as a gorgeous, cool-toned electric blue (the most “electric” looking in the set, by far). I believe it’s lighter and brighter than it’s matching eyeshadow. On the waterline, Radium is a simple light aqua color.

When I tested this, I was blown away by the application. UD Eye Pencils have a fantastic reputation, and I consider them Holy Grail products. But this-this one was far and away better than the others. It had excellent, rich, bold color payoff in one stroke, didn’t tug/drag/skip/pull on the lash line, and felt so smooth and creamy. It was literally the pinnacle of what the brand meant by “glide-on.”

And not only did it apply smoothly, the liner stayed put. Despite these being so creamy and easy to work with, despite the sweltering 80 degree heat, Radium did not move. It looked freshly applied for 9 hours. By 10, I had just a little smudging onto the inner rim of the eye. Throughout that whole time, the pigment remained bright and even. This also proved to be impressive on the waterline as well. By the 2nd hour of wear there, it looked a little less pigmented (greyish blue), and noticeably faded by 5 hours. By 6 hours, it had only worn off of the inner corner of the eye; the rest of the waterline remained lined. At this point, I  removed the product, so I’m curious how much longer it would’ve lasted there. However, 6 hours of staying power on the waterline is incredible to me (and more than enough for a perfect score in wear)!

I’m a fan of the way these liners are styled and packaged. The pencil is colored to match the shade of liner (in this case, bright blue), with the label and color name in white. The caps are silver plastic, with silver-colored ends. It’s cute, but functional as well. The color-coded system makes the liners painless to find and organize. The tips of the liners are also soft. They’re pointed for precision upon purchase, but I’ve never experienced them being too sharp or finely-pointed. These liners are buttery on the lid from the very first use. However, because they’re so creamy, there is some product waste when you sharpen them (which I hear can be resolved by freezing the pencil before sharpening).

Most UD liners retail for $19 USD. Radium, which came in a set of five, was part of a $32 USD price tag. I would totally pay either cost for this pencil. It’s vibrant, effortless to use, and long-wearing. While Radium sadly was only available in travel-size (0.03 oz), a full-size UD liner is 0.04 oz, so that’s not much of a loss. I still think it’s worth every penny. Oh, if only I had known! I would’ve sang it from the rooftops and urged everybody to pick up the set (which featured five flawless liners), if only to have this one. I’m extremely disappointed that, in the process of making a big fuss about including limited edition shades in their permanent range, Urban Decay happened to skip this one. I would repurchase this incessantly if I could! UD is a cruelty-free brand, but their profits benefit their parent company, L’Oreal, a brand notorious for it’s animal testing policy.

Color: 5/5
Wear: 5/5
Formula: 5/5
Packaging: 5/5
Price: 5/5
Wow Factor: 5/5
Overall: 30 (A+)
Recommend: Oh, if I could, I would! This liner is flawless. It’s bright, bold, creamy, long-wearing, and all kinds of wonderful. I’m deeply saddened that it’s no longer available and beauties no longer have the chance to experience how wonderful it is.

You can see (and shop) Urban Decay’s new range of pencil liners (and score some of their old “vintage” ones) on their website. medianet_width=’600′; medianet_height= ‘250’; medianet_crid=’228266391′;